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White to Play

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We’re finishing our 7th week of chess summer school with our last exercise in following a series of checks through to mate. For those of you who found this helpful, please get in touch. I’d like to hear your experience with these puzzles. This position is of particular interest because a famous grandmaster and chess teacher, Siegbert ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our seventh week of chess summer school, we are repeating the theme from last week: training your mind to think more than two moves ahead. We’ve made it easier by making every move a check. You should have fun with this one.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our seventh week of chess summer school, we are repeating the theme from last week: training your mind to think more than two moves ahead. We’ve made it easier by making every move a check. This game was won by the great chess teacher and grandmaster Siegbert Tarrasch. It was an “odds game.” Dr. T took off his queen (!) at the ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In our sixth week in chess summer school, we’re trying to get you to think more than a few moves ahead. It’s a little easier because all the moves to mate are checks! When you look at this position, you should realize something. In order to attack a castled position, you have to aim your pieces at the enemy king’s position. Try and get as...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In our sixth week in chess summer school, we’re trying to get you to think more than a few moves ahead. It’s a little easier because all the moves to mate are checks! This was a game, P. Schmidt-Dr. Schmidt, Heidelberg, 1946

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re now starting the sixth week of chess summer school with an example from one of my chess students who reached this position on the ICC a few days ago. I always tell my students to look at all checks and captures. She saw a capture that would work, Nxc2, but missed that there was a mate in four in the position. All four moves were checks. ...

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White to Play

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Our last rook and pawn ending in this fifth week of chess summer school is a very common one. White, of course, needs to keep the Black king from crossing the rook’s “laser line” on the board, but how do you get the king and pawn up to the other end of the board without unending checks? There’s a way!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

For week five of chess summer school, we’re sticking with the very essential rook and pawn endings. BTW, if you’re just getting on board with this, go back to previous weeks in our archive. Today’s position also happens a fair amount of times. Not only can you find your rook in front of the passed pawn, but often your king finds a hiding ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

For week five of chess summer school, we’re sticking with the very essential rook and pawn endings. We’ve been looking at key ideas that pop up with surprising regularity in these endings, so these “little tricks” are worth remembering. Let’s see if you learned a concept from last week with this position.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here we are already in week four of chess summer school. We are currently looking at rook and pawn endings, the bread and butter of good players. Our third example this week comes from a good player’s bag of tricks, so to speak. I can’t count the number of times my rook ended up in front of my pawn instead of the other way around. Here’s ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here we are already in week four of chess summer school. We are currently looking at rook and pawn endings, the bread and butter of good players. This very typical position is a draw, and there are several ways to hold the draw here. However, if you’re short of time for thinking, what’s the best and most direct move to guarantee the draw?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here we are already in week four of chess summer school. Having looked at some instructional king and pawn endings, we now turn our heads to an equally devilish set of endings known as rook and pawn endings. Because rooks are usually the last to enter the game, they are usually around in the endgame after the minor pieces and queens have ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the third week of chess summer school. This week is devoted to scary king and pawn endings. Why are they scary? It’s because one little mistake and you lose or draw instead of win. Our third example looks too easy for White. It’s not rare for a player to underestimate his opponent’s resources. This deceptive position is one of ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the third week of chess summer school. This week is devoted to scary king and pawn endings. Why are they scary? It’s because one little mistake and you lose or draw instead of win. Our second example of this requires you to look at the position and count. You must count in many king and pawn endings, especially when there is a race ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the third week of chess summer school. This week is devoted to scary king and pawn endings. Why are they scary? It’s because one little mistake and you lose or draw instead of win. Today’s rather simple position contains that little drop of poison. How do you win it? BTW, in endgames, you have to see it all the way to the … end!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the second week of chess summer school. We’re looking at how to save yourself in tough spots. Here, you’re a king position down, so to speak. One wrong move and your dead. In fact, Irving Chernev’s classic, Practical Chess Endings, shows a finely played win for White in this position. The only problem is that it’s a draw! See ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the second week of chess summer school. We’re looking at how to save yourself in tough spots. The last problem was a pawn down position. In this one you’re about to be a pawn down. How do you salvage a draw here?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Welcome to the second week of chess summer school. When I was a young chess player, I loved to play gambits. As I progressed, my opponents got stronger, and I often found myself just a pawn down with no attack. I learned how not to lose! I knew every king and pawn ending I could find so I could prevent my opponent from using his pawn advantage. ...

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Black to Play

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OK, you’ve had a week of bishop and pawn endings where you’ve learned about the value of underpromotion. We will finish with one that involves knowing the principle of opposition. That should be a big hint as it’s the only way Black can draw! Based on a composition by Falco in 1919.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

STOP!! This is NOT the same problem from yesterday. A little change has been made. The White bishop is on g3 rather than h2, and that little difference changes the position to a win for White! These two positions were composed by Centurini in the 1800s.

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